Category Archives for "Manufactured Housing"

5 Types of Video Marketing to Boost Manufactured Home Community

Video marketing is still the king of the hill when it comes to driving clicks and sales.

The numbers don’t lie. According to Social Media Today:

  • 72% of consumers prefer to watch a video to learn about a product or service.
  • 78% of consumers watch a video online at least once a week, and 55% do so once a day.
  • Viewers retain 95% of a video’s message after watching it.
  • 93% of business retain a new customer when they post a video on social media.
  • Companies that use video in their marketing experience 49% faster growth than companies that don’t use video.

I hope you’re as impressed by these statistics as I am. Since video is easier and more affordable to produce than every before, here are 5 types of video marketing to try to help you grow your business.

#1: Community Videos

People need to understand what a MH community is – and how it will benefit them – before they buy a home there. I don’t think I need to explain why because I’m sure you feel that way too. If you don’t grasp how your life can be better at a community, you’re not going to spend your money on a home there.

For that reason, community videos are a cornerstone of any effective video marketing strategy. Community videos are straightforward, but here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Show the entrance to your community
  • Show the manufactured home community amenities
  • If there are common areas, show them
  • Show an accurate representation of the typical homes in your community

Community videos should be posted on your website. You may also want to put them on a dedicated landing page, your blog, and your social media pages.

#2: Testimonial Videos 

Customer reviews are important in every industry, but a testimonial from a resident can carry far more weight than an ordinary review.

Testimonials tend to include more detailed information than reviews. They give you a chance to highlight the specific things you did for a resident and the specific ways your community has improved their life. You can also encourage customers who provide testimonials to talk about their experience with your community.

In other words, testimonial videos provide potential leads with a detailed look at the customer experience at your mobile home community – and they can help to overcome many of the most common buyer objections, so you can make more sales.

#3: Brand Story Videos

What is your brand’s story? Today’s consumers want to identify with the brands they support. You can help them identify with you by sharing a customer-centric brand story that lets them visualize how you can help them.

In other words, you’re not telling your origin story so much as you are telling the customer’s journey in an entertaining and compelling way. This kind of marketing has become increasingly popular.

Your job, when creating a brand story video, is to make your customer – that is, the person watching the video – into the hero. To do that, you’ll need to:

  • Identify the most common problems you solve
  • Create a story arc to show how your product or service solves the problem
  • Encourage the viewer to see themselves in whatever success story you’re presenting

Another way to look at this kind of video is as a pre-testimonial – sort of a fictionalized version of what a customer’s life could look like if they buy your product or use your service.

#4: Frequently Asked Questions Video

We all know about FAQ, right? It’s the section on every website where customers’ most common questions are asked and answered. These days, they’re also a great way to improve your SEO since questions and voice search go together like milk and cookies.

FAQ videos don’t need to answer every question at once. Instead, you should consider doing a series of short videos that answer one question or several related ones in an entertaining way.

If you want to get creative with this type of video, you could do a whiteboard video or even an animated video illustrating the answer to your FAQs. There’s no reason that an informational video can’t be entertaining, too.

#5: Personalized Sales Videos 

This last idea won’t work for every business, but it provides a way to hook potential leads Instead of sending a lead a generic, one-size-fits-all video, you can send them something personalized.

Personalized sales videos should:

  • Address the prospect by name.
  • Highlight the specific ways you can help them.
  • Add information that will help the prospect overcome any objections they might have to buying a home in your community.

Keep in mind that this type of video doesn’t need to have huge production value. It should feel like you or your salesperson is speaking directly to the prospect, giving them valuable information that will help them understand the benefits of doing business with you.

The message that a personalized sales video sends is that you care deeply about your customers. If you’re willing to shoot a personalized video before a prospect is even a client, it makes them feel that you’ll provide top-notch customer service after they sign on.

Video marketing isn’t going anywhere. You can produce videos without spending a lot of money, and once you have created a video, it can be posted anywhere you post content online, including your website, blog, and social media pages.

Of course, if you try these methods, you can blend them with cool video technology, such as 360-video, virtual reality, or live video. Your focus should always be on creating the kind of video content that’s most likely to convert leads into paying customers.

4 Ways to Get Visitors Back to Your Website

Attracting a visitor to your website once is good. It means that your marketing is strong enough – or your Google rank is high enough – that you stood out from the competition and snagged some traffic

So what? If you know anything at all about marketing, you know that it’s rare for a first-time visitor to a website to buy anything or even fill out a subscription form. It’s what they do on their NEXT visit – and the one after that – that will determine whether you’ve gained a new customer. Makes sense, but it never ceases to amaze me how many businesses don’t focus on repeat traffic. But, that’s about to change. Here are 5 foolproof ways to get those first time visitors BACK to your website so you can make some money.

#1: Get Them to Opt In to Your Mailing List

I know, I just said it was asking a lot to get a first-time visitor to your site to subscribe to your mailing list. But I didn’t say it was impossible! The key, of course, is to give them a compelling reason to subscribe. Here are some ways you can do that:

1. Put your opt-in form above the fold. That way, they won’t need to scroll down to see it – and they’ll know what they’ll be getting if they decide to subscribe. If people aren’t coming back to your website, it could be because they didn’t enjoy their experience the first time they visited. That means that prioritizing usability is one of the best ways to encourage repeat visits.

2.Simplify your form. I get that it’s tempting to ask a new subscriber for extra information – but all you really need is their email address and maybe a first name if you want to personalize your emails. Anything else – whether it’s their phone number, mailing address, URL, or shoe size – is extra. You should think long and hard about adding fields to your form.

3. Incentivize the opt-in. A compelling and useful lead magnet can do a lot to get someone to fill out that form.

4.Write a killer headline and call to action. Instead of just “Subscribe to our newsletter,” try “Get new marketing tips every day” as a headline. And make the CTA just as exciting. Once a potential customer’s on your mailing list, you can email them with reasons to come back to your website. Simple, right?

#2: Prioritize the User Experience 

If people aren’t coming back to your website, it could be because they didn’t enjoy their experience the first time they visited. That means that prioritizing usability is one of the best ways to encourage repeat visits. Some of the things to think about when it comes to usability are:

» Your site’s loading time
» Mobile responsiveness
» Clear and easy-to-use menus
» Text that’s broken up with white space, images, and formatting (sub headers, bullet points, numbers, etc.)
» Working internal and external links that make it easy to find related content.

If it’s been a while since you’ve evaluated the usability of your site, now’s a good time to do it to make sure that you’re not frustrating visitors and discouraging them from returning to your site in the future.

#3: Make the Content on Your Site Relevant to Your Target Audience

Are people finding what they expect to find on your site? If a customer comes to you because they’re searching for art supplies, for example, think about what you can offer them that will add value to the products you sell. Can you provide a video tutorial on painting technique? A link to the website of an artist who uses that product? The idea is to make sure that the content on your site – whatever it is – is directly relevant to the people you most want to attract. If you’re selling Human Resources software, have blog posts about topics that are relevant to HR professionals.

#4: Offer Solutions to Common Problems

The final thing you can do is to make the content on your website solution-oriented. Most people who type a keyword into Google do so because they’re looking for answers. That means that if you want them to bookmark your site, you need to provide them with what they need.

Focusing on solutions can also help you improve your site’s rank for keywords in voice search. Given the increase in the use of “Ok Google” as well as virtual assistants like Siri, Alexa, and Cortana, it makes sense to think about the questions that searchers are likely to ask when looking for sites like yours. Then, you can optimize your useful content for those questions.

Your solutions may come in any format you choose. You might create a blog post with a response to one question or produce a video or even a short webinar for another. The key is to focus on the visitor’s needs instead of promoting your company or brand. There’ll be time enough for that later.

>